Winston Mosley polaroid with writing on back

Winston Mosley polaroid with writing on back

320.00

Catherine Susan "Kitty" Genovese (July 7, 1935 – March 13, 1964) was an American woman who was stabbed to death outside her apartment building in Kew Gardens, a neighborhood in the New York City borough of Queens, on March 13, 1964.[3]

Two weeks after printing a short article on the attack, The New York Times published a longer report that conveyed a scene of indifference from neighbors who failed to come to Genovese's aid, claiming 37 or 38 witnesses saw or heard the attack and did not call the police. The incident prompted inquiries into what became known as the bystander effect or "Genovese syndrome".[4] Some researchers have questioned this version of events, offering alternative explanations as to why neighbors failed to intervene, and suggesting that the actual number of witnesses was far fewer than reported. In 2015, Genovese's younger brother Bill said that the police were indeed summoned twice but did not respond because they believed it was a domestic dispute, and blames The New York Times for faulty reporting.

After the death of the perpetrator in 2016, The New York Times called the second story "flawed", adding:

While there was no question that the attack occurred, and that some neighbors ignored cries for help, the portrayal of 38 witnesses as fully aware and unresponsive was erroneous. The article grossly exaggerated the number of witnesses and what they had perceived. None saw the attack in its entirety. Only a few had glimpsed parts of it, or recognized the cries for help. Many thought they had heard lovers or drunks quarreling. There were two attacks, not three. And afterward, two people did call the police. A 70-year-old woman ventured out and cradled the dying victim in her arms until they arrived. Ms. Genovese died on the way to a hospital.

Bill Genovese's 2015 film "The Witness" showed an interview with neighbor Sophia Farrar, who was around Kitty's age; Farrar explained in the film that she ran down to the stairwell when she heard her friend's screams, and held her as she was dying. Genovese's attacker, Manhattan native Winston Moseley, was arrested during a house burglary several days after the attack; and he confessed to the murder while in custody, along with the murders and sexual assaults of two other women. At his trial, he was found guilty and sentenced to be executed, which was later reduced to life imprisonment. He died in prison on March 28, 2016, at the age of 81.

The polaroid is unsigned. On the back, there is some writing.

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